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Chris Ofili At The New Museum

Chris Ofili New Museum NY

Today is the opening of the first ever large-scale museum show in the US show by British artist Chris Ofili.  The last time his work was shown in New York was in 1999 at the Brooklyn Museum.  His piece, the Holy Virgin Mary (below bottom right) caused quite a stir, with former Mayor Giuliani trying to have the work banned.  Now that piece and many more are on show at The New Museum, in what can only be described as one of the most refreshing museum shows so far this season.

Covering three entire floors of the museum, each gallery space is devoted to one period and style of the artist’s career.  An entire wall covered with incredible small water colors, done between 1995 and 2005, depicting men and women in splendid matching African robes is spellbinding.   From the canvases using the artist’s now infamous elephant dung material, to his most recent and vibrant work set against purple gallery walls, this museum show is an absolute must see.

Chris Ofili. Night and Day. The New Museum. 235 Bowery. NY. NY. 10002. Tel: 212 219 1222
 

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Zero: Countdown To Tomorrow At the Guggenheim

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Zero: Countdown To Tomorrow 1950s, 1960s opened today at the Guggenheim.  The exhibition showcases the history of the experimental German artists’ group “Zero”, an international network of artists that shared an aspiration to redefine and transform art in the aftermath of World War II.   This is the first time a show has been staged in the US on the Zero artists and to see the artists’ pieces, who include the likes of Yves Klein, Yayoi Kusama and core German members, Heinz Mack, Otto Piene, and Günther Uecker, take over the entire rotunda of the Guggenheim gallery, is to discover a new set of fascinating modern art rarely seen in the US.

Zero: Countdown To Tomorrow 1950s, 1960s. Guggenheim Museum. 1071 Fifth Avenue. NY. October 10th – January 7th 2015
 
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Nick Cave’s Two Amazing Chelsea Shows

DSC_7122Artist Nick Cave never fails to both wow us and move us at the same time with his unique, beautiful and thought-provoking work.  His latest works “Rescue” and “Made For Whites by Whites” spans two gallery spaces at Jack Shainman gallery on 20th and 24th Street respectively.

The 24th Street gallery is full of giant porcelain dogs, the type that are no longer in vogue, surrounded by elaborate dens created by the artist. On 20th Street, the exhibition showcases racially charged vintage objects. This project began when Cave found a container at a flea market shaped like the head of a black man and labeled ‘Spittoon.’ He was shocked and began, “to rehabilitate the problematic loaded object and find a place of reverence and empowerment through reuse”.  He has achieved this objective with great beauty and poise as his work always does.  Both shows close this weekend so if you haven’t seen them yet, run to Chelsea before they end.

Nick Cave. Rescue. Jack Shainman. 524 West 24th Street. NY 10011. Closes 11th October, 2014
Nick Cave. Made by Whites for Whites. Jack Shainman. 513 West 20th Street. NY 10011. Closes 11th October, 2014
 
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Art At Lincoln Centre

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There’s a giant frameless box placed right in front of the fountain at Lincoln Centre.  Irish artist John Gerrard is the creator of “Solar Reserve” a large-scale LED installation.  Created by photographing a solar power plant in the Nevada desert over the period of an entire year, the artist speeds up the footage of more than 10,000 photographs to show an entire year of solar energy being generated in just a few short moments.

Depending on the time of day you visit, you may see the Nevada sunrise, sunset or afternoon.  As you can imagine, it looks monumental in the evening, and anybody attending one of the many upcoming cultural events at Lincoln Centre will delight in the piece.  On show until December, this is a wonderful example of public art in New York.

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A Skyfarm Fortress

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A Skyfarm Fortress is a fitting title for the epic and beautiful paper installation by New York artist Jacob Hashimoto that currently fills Mary Boone Gallery on 24th Street. Comprised of thousands of tiny paper and bamboo kites that are carefully strung together, this breathtaking show delicately takes over the entire gallery, from floor to ceiling and wall to wall.

Entering Hashimoto’s colorful and immense world from the urban streets of Chelsea, instantly elevates your mood and makes for a highlight on the Chelsea art scene this month.

Jacob Hashimoto. Skyfarm Fortress. Mary Boone Gallery. 541 West 24th Street. NY. 10011. Until 25th October, 2014

 

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Kasher Potamkin Opens Its Doors

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The heavy white marble desk where gallerist Andi Potamkin spends her days, might be the most beautiful work space we’ve ever seen.  From her desk on the second floor of the newly opened Kasher Potamkin gallery, she can gaze across 26th Street and watch art lovers from around the world stroll through Chelsea, or she can admire the vast and unique new gallery space she has created.

With a fresh take on the traditional art gallery, Kasher Potamkin is somewhat of a lifestyle space.  A place where you’ll find art photography from contemporary fashion photographers like Miles Aldridge, furniture from artists the Haas Brothers,  contemporary jewellery, fashion as well as fine art, all shown alongside each other in what amounts to be one of those spaces that has quickly become a hot must-visit location on the New York art and fashion scene.

Kasher Potamkin. 515 West 26th Street. 2nd Floor. New York. NY. 10001. Tel: 917 265 8060
 

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